Midwest Book Review for Alex Asks Grandpa About the Olden Days

midwest-book-review-of-alex-asks-grandpa-about-the-olden-days-1940s-story

Midwest Book Review for Alex Asks Grandpa About the Olden Days

Midwest Book Review for Alex Asks Grandpa About the Olden Days

Alex Asks Grandpa About the Olden Days: A 1940s Story

Midwest Book Review March 2020

Gary L. Wilhelm
9781729375280, $12.00 paperback, 74 pages
B07ZZK89V1, $4.99, Kindle
Alex Asks Grandpa About the Olden Days: A 1940’s Story
shows a younger child asking about the olden days (before he was born). Life was different decades ago with party-line phones, radios but no television or videos, hearing chicks in the post office each spring, a blacksmith who would help fix kids’ bikes, and seeing threshing machines at harvest time. Even though grandpa lived in a small town in South Dakota, there were differences between city and country life. City Grandma read library books aloud, while country grandma canned food. Grandpa’s mother taught in a one-room schoolhouse. His father’s construction company dug roads and church basements, often for free. Grandpa and Alex have a good talk about the olden days in this multi-genre nonfiction and fiction book.

Alex-Asks-Grandpa-About-the-Olden-Days-a-1940s-Story

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Thank you for reading, Gary

midwest-book-review-of-alex-asks-grandpa-about-the-olden-days-1940s-story

Gary Wilhelm is a retired engineer with a master’s degree from South Dakota State University, who did research and development work in America, Asia, and Europe for consumer, commercial, and military products, during a career of several decades. In addition to being a civilian engineer embedded with the Marines during the Vietnam War in 1968 and 1969, he worked developing products ranging from EF Johnson citizens band radio, and the Texas Instruments home computer, communications technology for use within buildings, and with medical devices implanted within the body, to the Howitzer Improvement Program (HIP) for army artillery on the battlefield. He was also a representative on a North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) committee. He hosted the USA meeting of the committee at Honeywell.
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